Estate litigation oftentimes arises when parents favor one or more of their children over others in their estate plans. Fortunately, at least for the parents, they typically do not have to deal with the issues involved in the litigation, as they are deceased by the time that it arises. As the Second Department’s decision in

One of the most common objections in probate contests is the allegation that the propounded instrument was a product of undue influence. In our latest entry, Ilene Cooper reflects upon two decisions from 2011 in which the Surrogate’s Courts of New York and Kings Counties addressed such claims, which arose from contrasting fact patterns.
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Administering the estate of a decedent who dies intestate is sometimes more complicated than one of a decedent who dies leaving a will. The distributees of an intestate decedent are often unknown, leading to citation by publication and a kinship hearing with respect to anyone who appears alleging to be an heir. Frank Santoro discusses these situations in our most recent entry.
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As recognized by Surrogate Glen in the recent decision of Matter of Rosasco, the distinction between undue influence and duress is often blurred in the context of contested probate proceedings. Frank Santoro explains the differences between the two legal concepts in our most recent entry.
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New York’s “slayer rule” generally prohibits an individual from benefiting from his own wrongdoing. However, due to the unusual facts of a case that is developing in Suffolk County, a murderer may indirectly inherit his victim’s estate through intestacy. Robert Harper discusses the situation in this week’s entry.
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